Tag Archives: Innovation

designfuturist.com is now Live

Design Futurist recently launched a new website. This blog is now hosted at www.designfuturist.com/news. We hope you’ll find the new layout more comprehensive, up-to-date, and easy to navigate. We welcome your feedback and look forward making a difference with you!

NATALIA

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How Can We Do Good

INDEX: is the world’s INDEX: to Design to Improve Life. From Denmark, by the world, for the world.

Kigge Hvid, CEO INDEX: recalls, “The change came about because upon establishing INDEX: we traveled, talked and listened – to designers, media people, CEOs, heads of design and innovation, to academics and to artists – all over the world.”

“During these initial conversations, we strived to understand what a world event for design should focus on and offer if it should be of relevance to our interlocutors.”

During those talks, Kigge says, everyone – no matter where or how distinctive their settings – pointed to the human potential of design and to the value of design perception, not only in traditional products but also in the design of services, process and systems.

Recently, I had a chat with INDEX: about my work, fashion, and the future of sustainability.

For the complete interview visit: http://tiny.cc/5SAC9



Sustainable Innovation and Jobs

Recently, I had the pleasure of sitting down to lunch with Reshma Saujani, the Congressional Democratic Candidate for the 14th District in New York City (eg. Murray Hill, East Village, Queens). Reshma is a community activist, a Yale University legal scholar, and an attorney in New York City. She is also the daughter of political refugees whose story embodies the promise of life in America.

Reshma’s top priority in Congress will be to rebalance New York City’s economy as an innovation capital and diversified hub of next generation industries that create thousands of new jobs for its communities, and sets New York on a course of sustainable economic growth.

I am a fan of  Reshma and agree with her goals. I’ve joined her and the public in thinking out new ways to spur innovation and sustainable economic development in New York City.

For one, it is important that we support the creation of companies that use technology to create tangible products, which can be in themselves, solutions to our economic and environmental challenges. For the entire article visit: http://tiny.cc/gb9zC

NATALIA

Revolutionaries are T-shaped and Rare

“Revolutionaries who have driven most recent innovation and who will drive nearly all of it in the future are T-shaped. That is, they have their specialties—areas of deep expertise—but on top of that they boast a solid breadth, an umbrella if you will, of wide-ranging knowledge and interests. It is the ability to work in an interdisciplinary fashion and to see how different ideas, sectors, people, and markets connect,” says Donofrio.

I recently read Innovation that Matters, by Nicholas M. Donofrio. It articulates the characteristics of many innovators and describes them as rare individuals. More interestingly, it argues for a new era of invention, one that thinks not about quantity but about problem solving. Donorfrio, an IBM veteran acknowledges the advancements made in computing but points out the need to examine the world and see what is missing, instead of simply assuming the answer is more of the same.

Today innovation normally centers around more power he says, more storage or more speed, whether it is necessary or not. He argues that better education is the solution to creating more revolutionaries. I agree but do not believe the solution is as simple as good education. Depth and breath can be learned but creativity and good will are not simply products of the mind. NATALIA

For the full article visit: http://tiny.cc/OH8UY

Transformative Design

Sustainability is an enabler of innovation and should be at the core of the design of products and services and the development of new business models – World Economic Forum, Sustainable Consumption http://ping.fm/RZlJH

Nokia Designs that Save, Cost More

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In the New York Times article, “Nokia Tries to Undo Blunders in U.S.,” journalist, Kevin J. O’brien interviews executives at Nokia, a Finnish company and the world’s largest cell phone maker, about its decline in the United States.

Nokia’s comments are best summarized by this quote: “Among its biggest blunders, analysts and former Nokia executives say, the company failed to design many of its phones to the tastes of American consumers, instead mass producing devices for the global market to save on production costs.” That move cost Nokia almost a 30% share of the American market. On Thursday, Nokia posted a 1.36 billion loss and a global sales decline of 20%.

Evident in this story: the value of good design, and the cost of short-term thinking.

Example, Nokia was slow to develop a smart phone that could compete with the iPhone, a consistently growing sector of the cell phone market. And refused to tailor merchandise to local tastes and demands, at a penalty. The cell phone industry is extremely competitive and good design is an important element to any business success story.

Now, “Mark Louison, president of Nokia’s North American unit, says the company is laying the groundwork for long-term success.” Long-term, is a word not often uttered in corporate America. That said, having a vision of the long-term, the future that is, will be critical to any company looking to thrive.

If  only more executives  would take the time to understand the long-term picture and build for local markets, we would all benefit from an environmentally and economically sustainable world. NATALIA

Hip-tech Pop Culture

When I see performers like Kanye West and Lady Gaga sporting light up clothing and accessories I can’t help but think that this could be a glimpse into the near future of fashion.  The visceral use of the technology lends itself in performance but could there actually be a real world purpose? Yes, but not yet. A new technology called Lumalive has emerged, and like most fashion technology collaborations, Lumalive is best suited as marketing buzz. Until there are more fashion designers that understand material technology and see the big picture, we will continue to see frivolous high-tech innovations.

Lumalive is a branch off product from Phillips, and specializes in pieces of clothing with embedded LED lights that can create moving images within the textile itself. So far, they have been pushing the idea that this is an eye catching way to promote your company, product or event.  The images that are created within the garment are very generic and look like a scrolling movie theater marquee. None the less, the experience is visually stimulating, and as this technology evolves the images will become more complex.

It seems inevitable that its novelty will wear off and that Lumalive will make its way into mainstream retail. Considering how fast trends in fashion move people may just crave a light bright garment for back to school.  Now the idea of illuminating clothing becoming accessible doesn’t seem to be so Tron-esque anymore.

CABEZAS

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