Monthly Archives: April 2010

Dangerous Chemicals In Your Clothing

Did you know that the products you wear contain dangerous chemicals that have a proven harmful effect on your health? Not only do we have to give careful consideration to the food we put in our bodies, we must consider the clothing and shoes we wear. Worst of all, children are the most vulnerable to the negative effects of chemicals that are added to otherwise perfectly safe materials. Two-year-old children are being exposed to dangerous levels of hormone-disrupting chemicals in domestic products such as rubber clogs and sun creams, according to an EU investigation being studied by the government. So what can you do? Until these chemicals are banned, it is important to choose products certified organic.

Hormone disrupting chemicals used in household products

• Phthalates are used in the manufacture of rubber clogs, rubber boots, soap packaging, products made from PVC, bath mats and soft toys. They are also found in food products as a result of environmental pollution, according to the Danish study.

• Oestrogen-like substances, including chemicals known as parabens, occur in cosmetics, sun creams and moisturising lotions.

• Pesticides, such as DDT, dioxins and PCBs, are also known hormone-disruptors.

If you would like to lean about what the European Union is doing to regulate the this problem, please click here.

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The Sustainable Fashion Workshop: NY

Want to learn about sustainable fashion from an expert? Interested in green fashion and textiles?  Want to learn new skills for your career in design? Join the fashion revolution and attend an exclusive workshop on Sustainable Fashion and Textiles in New York City. Award-winning fashion designer and founder of Design Futurist, Natalia Allen will explain the basics of green fashion. She will discuss the important facts about sustainable fashion and textiles to help you make informed decisions as a consumer and discover new insights for your career.

Sustainable fashion is not just a trend it’s a social movement. More and more consumers see the importance of choosing organic and fair trade clothing. But so far there is a lot of confusion around what sustainable fashion really is. So many companies say that their products are green. But how can you tell?

During the workshop, Natalia will bust myths about sustainable fashion and textiles and provide you with resources to learn more.

The Sustainable Fashion Workshop was designed to share valuable information with anyone who loves fashion and wants to become more competitive in their field. Networking is encouraged so don’t forget to bring your business cards. To register, please click here.

Photo featured above:

Harveys creative design weaves recycled seat belts of different shades into a boxy, perfectly sized handbag that’s sure to inspire conversation and perhaps conservation. The inner lining is made of hemp and printed (eco-friendly ink, of course) with  “recycle” symbols incorporating seat belts instead of arrows.